Infrastructural Interventions

I’m excited to announce that the registration for the “Infrastructural Interventions” (21-22 June 2021) workshop is open on Eventbrite. Get a ticket now!

This is the first event in the Digital Humanities & Critical Infrastructure Studies Workshop Series organised by King’s Digital Lab, King’s College Department of Digital Humanities, and Critical Infrastructures Studies Initiative (cistudies.org). The event brings together leading thinkers in Digital Humanities to critically interrogate the socio-technical dimensions of infrastructure. Check out the great lineup of speakers (Alan Liu, James Smithies, Laura Mandell, Matthew K. Gold, Susan Brown, Lauren F. Klein, Paola Ricaurte Quijano, Jonathan Gray, David M. Berry), abstracts and the program at the CIStudies website here.

In this workshop, DH theorists will interrogate the nature and fragility of infrastructure at individual, social, and planetary scales, and attempt to reconfigure their nature from social justice, feminist and decolonial perspectives. The following questions will guide us through the discussion: How, precisely, did our contemporary digital infrastructure evolve? How are different actors challenging, contesting and creating alternatives to official data infrastructures? How can DH infrastructure be informed by an analysis of power—and even actively challenge existing power imbalances? How might DH infrastructure reject the hierarchical and other divisions that currently structure DH work? How can digital humanists reimagine and rebuild the world differently through infrastructure?

This workshop is part of my MSCA research project (dhinfra.org) and I’m thrilled to be the lead organiser of this wonderful event!

Infrastructure as the Origin of Inequities

I have recently participated in the Global Digital Humanities Symposium organised by Michigan State University, US. You can find the abstract for my talk “Infrastructure as the Origin of Inequities: A Case of Global Digital Humanities” below and slides presentation on my research blog dhinfra.org. More details can be found on the MSU Global DH website here.

Infrastructure as the Origin of Inequities: A Case of Global Digital Humanities

The COVID-19 pandemic has been an exceptional time that forced society to shift everyday life to online spaces and create provisional forms of doing and acting. It has prompted a narrative of a compressed and connected world in a Zoom meeting. The pandemic outbreak, however, has also disclosed long-standing and deep structural inequities that run along demographic, geopolitical, and infrastructure fault lines. I argue that this is a good time to reconsider some of the pressing questions: How do the power dynamics of actors of knowledge production (e.g., information infrastructures, digital libraries, and publishers) define and materialize the contours of global science and humanities? Where are we now in our efforts to improve a networked global science and education based on values of equal access to resources, inclusive participation, and the diversity of epistemologies?

In this presentation, I aim to reflect on global dimensions of knowledge infrastructure to understand the specification and realization of global digital humanities – the branch of digital humanities (DH) focused on the global development of the field and representation of the DH community. I propose to look at the social side of the aspects of infrastructure – connection, standardization, and access – to comprehend the global configuration of DH. Along with the expansion across the world, DH communities face issues of unequal participation and opportunities in developing the field. I aim to show that discrepancies in the global development of DH lie at the root of existing infrastructure inequalities. Drawing on the field of science and technology studies, I argue that in order to overcome these imbalances, the community can seek to practice “infrastructuring” global DH; this means to build an inclusive network of unique nodes of local communities on the top of the geopolitical system of knowledge infrastructure.

Rebuilding laboratories: an interdisciplinary perspective

I am very excited about the coming workshop “Rebuilding Laboratories” taking place at the Institute of Advanced Studies at the University of Birmingham on 19th November. I am co-organizing this event together with Dr Julia P Myatt, Acting Dean of the Liberal Arts and Natural Sciences.

The chemical laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston: women and men at class. Wood engraving, c. 1880. Source: Europeana Collections

This workshop brings together University of Birmingham experts in the field of the history of science and medicine, digital humanities, interdisciplinary studies, and knowledge production as well as the heads of scientific labs, to initiate the first discussion on laboratories from an inclusive and interdisciplinary perspective. The workshop speakers include Prof Jonathan Reinarz and Dr Vanessa Heggie from the Institute of Applied Health Research who will talk about labs from a historical and sociological perspective. Prof Jonathan Seville, Academic Director of the Collaborative Teaching Lab, will present this innovative lab that brings together practical teaching activities across a broad range of science and engineering disciplines. Prof Seville will discuss the concepts of collaboration and interdisciplinarity in practice. Prof Henry Chapman from the College of Arts and Law and a coordinator of Digital Humanities Forum will reflect on building an interdisciplinary lab for digital humanities. Further, Dr Julia P Myatt from the LANS and the School of Biosciences will discuss a plan for establishing the LANS lab to enhance collaborative research. Dr Ilija Rašović, from the LANS and the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, will reflect on the idea of a laboratory in the context of “making materials and cooking chemicals”. Dr Matthew Hayler from the Department of English Literature and Co-director of the Centre for Digital Cultures will discuss digital cultures laboratories. I, in turn, will present the concept of a laboratory in/for the humanities with a focus on different origins of labs ranging from science to industrial labs.

The event will be open with a keynote speaker, Dr James Smithies, Director of King’s Digital Lab at King’s College London who will talk about digital humanities labs in a broader context of global cyber-infrastructure.

The overall aim is to provide an intellectual discussion on the role of labs in supporting interdisciplinarity and enhancing the empirical knowledge and to stimulate the exchange of experiences between different disciplines.

Here you can find the workshop agenda. The info about the event is published on the IAS website.

Spaces of the Humanities Practices

How is the humanities attached to a place? Why does the space of scholarly practices matter? How do new spaces of humanities inquiry (e.g., laboratories and makerspaces) both transform and drive the research and teaching practices? These questions are a starting point for my current research on the role of space for humanities work. I am conducting this study at the Institute of Advanced Studies (IAS) at the University of Birmingham. This coming Wednesday, 13th November, I will give a public lecture “Place Matters: Exploring New Sites of the Humanities Practices” at the IAS. This is a great opportunity for me to share and discuss my preliminary results. In the last weeks, I have been writing an article under the same title which hopefully will be soon finalized and submitted for publication.

You can find the abstract of my talk on the IAS website. I particularly love the poster! I found this image at the Europeana Collections and thought it is a perfect suit to my topic. The picture shows women and men at the chemical laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston. It is from 1880 and represents wood engraving techniques. Such a great treasure!

RDA Plenary Meeting

Together with my team of Data Agents working in the Research Data Management Support Initiative at Aalto University, we presented our work and activities at the Research Data Alliance’s 14th Plenary Meeting taking place from 23-25 October 2019 in Helsinki. It is great to share our efforts and achievements in managing research data better and making data open for everyone!

The poster is available in the Zenodo repository. Please take a look at our presentation, titled “Illustration of Data Agents network of Aalto University: Data Agents: How to put research data management into practice?”.

Fellowship at the University of Birmingham

I am very happy to share that I have been awarded the Vanguard Fellowship at the Institute of Advanced Studies at the University of Birmingham. I will visit the Liberal Arts and Natural Science from 20 October to 24 November 2019. The next five weeks will be very exciting and busy! I will give a public lecture, titled “Place Matters: Exploring New Sites of the Humanities Practices” and co-organize a workshop “Rebuilding Laboratories”. I am very much looking forward to inspiring discussions on interdisciplinarity, knowledge production, and laboratories!

WM Fellowship at King’s

The past few weeks were intensive, busy, and exciting! I visited the Department of Digital Humanities (DDH) at King’s College London on a Willard McCarty fellowship. It was a great pleasure to meet the academic staff and share research interests and experience. Thanks for all inspiring talks!

On 23 May, I gave a talk at the event “Humanities Laboratories: Critical Infrastructures and Knowledge Experiments”, hosted by the DDH with King’s Digital Lab (KDL), in conjunction with the Critical infrastructure Studies initiative. The event was chaired by Arianna Ciula (Deputy Director & Senior Research Software Analyst, KDL) and introduced by Prof. Willard McCarty. Next, James Smithies (Director, KDL; Deputy Director, KCL eResearch) gave a talk about a laboratory in the context of postphenomenology and presented King’s Digital Lab as socio-technical system. After that, Jonathan Gray (Co-founder of the Public Data Lab, and Lecturer in Critical Infrastructure Studies, DDH) reflected on the development of the Public Data Lab, a unique model of lab as a network of researchers and research centres from across Europe established around questions of the data society. After that, I presented my recent work on humanities laboratories from the perspective of laboratory studies, critical infrastructure studies, and social lab theorists. The resources and photos will be soon published on the WM Fellowship’s website. Meanwhile, you can find my presentation under the “Materials” section!

KCL event: “Humanities Laboratories”

I am so excited to be a keynote for the King’s event “Humanities Laboratories: Critical Infrastructures and Knowledge Experiments” on May 23, 2019. The event will revolve around the critical and epistemological roles of humanities labs in supporting and extending academic research and learning beyond traditional classrooms.

The event will be hosted by the Department of Digital Humanities (DDH) with King’s Digital Lab (KDL), in conjunction with the Critical Infrastructure Studies (https://cistudies.org/) initiative. It will be chaired by Arianna Ciula (Deputy Director & Senior Research Software Analyst, KDL) and introduced by James Smithies (Director, KDL; Deputy Director, KCL eResearch) and Jonathan Gray (Co-founder of the Public Data Lab, and Lecturer in Critical Infrastructure Studies, DDH, KCL). Next, as Willard McCarty’s Fellow, I will give a talk “A Laboratory as Critical Infrastructure in the Humanities”. The program and abstracts can be found here.