My new article on re(designing) spaces for humanities practices

I am pleased to see that my new open access article “Place matters: Thinking about spaces for humanities practices” has been published online first in Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. This essay was written as part of my Vanguard Fellowship at the Institute of Advanced Studies at the University of Birmingham. It is open access so please feel free to read it online and download it for free here.

This essay reflects on the role of place for humanities practices and contributes to emerging discussions on infrastructure for the humanities and socio-material conditions of scholarly knowledge production. I provide a theoretical framework for studying venues for humanities work drawing on the phenomenological approach to the concepts of place and space, the pedagogical perspective on learning spaces in higher education, and epistemological studies of scientific places. Next, I analyse the landscape for the reconfiguration of humanities venues and present arguments for engaging with space by referring to the functioning of digital humanities. This essay shows that place is an extremely important resource, seeing as it is endowed with the power to drive new practices, institutionalize a community, and consolidate a discipline. Therefore, humanists should reflect critically on the ‘architecture of the humanities’ and engage in making their own spaces that determine practices, communication, and well-being.

“The Laboratory Turn”: My article in the DHQ

My open access article “The Laboratory Turn: Exploring Discourses, Landscapes, and Models of Humanities Labs” has been published in the Digital Humanities Quarterly (2020, 14.3). I was very much looking forward to it. Check it out here!

The goal of this paper is to track the path of the formation of the laboratory turn in the humanities and understand the conditions, meanings, and functions of humanities labs. The first section investigates three discourses that gave rise to the emergence of a laboratory in the humanities: the transformation of the humanities infrastructure within the university, paradigm shifts in the social sciences, and the expansion of cultural categories of innovation, the maker movement (the proliferation of makerspaces), and the idea of community. Next, I present a history of the laboratory in the humanities and determine the shift from a laboratory as a physical place to conceptual laboratory. The last section analyses five models for humanities labs based on laboratories’ statements and operations: the center-type lab, the techno-science lab, the work station-type lab, the social challenges-centric lab, and virtual lab. I seek to show that the laboratory turn has emerged in the humanities as a part of a wider process of the laboratorization of social life, which has been occurring since the 1980s. Next, the study indicates the role of digital humanities as the driving force behind building a laboratory space, which supports situated practices, the collaborative, and technology-based projects. The article shows that the humanities lab does not simply imitate the science lab but adapts this new infrastructure for its own purposes and needs.

RDA Plenary Meeting

Together with my team of Data Agents working in the Research Data Management Support Initiative at Aalto University, we presented our work and activities at the Research Data Alliance’s 14th Plenary Meeting taking place from 23-25 October 2019 in Helsinki. It is great to share our efforts and achievements in managing research data better and making data open for everyone!

The poster is available in the Zenodo repository. Please take a look at our presentation, titled “Illustration of Data Agents network of Aalto University: Data Agents: How to put research data management into practice?”.

OpenGLAM@Aalto

Tomorrow, on 28 March, Aalto University is organizing Open GLAM meetup to connect students, professionals, and creative people with the GLAM community (Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums). The program includes fascinating topics about reusing and sharing open cultural heritage data. Join us: 28 March 2019, 3pm-5pm, Aalto University Learning Centre!

More info on the AvoinGLAM website which is a Finnish network of people and institutions interested in and working among open culture and cultural materials. It is part of an international OpenGLAM network.

ARTS Open Science drop-in sessions

I am co-organizing two-day drop-in sessions about open science and research data management at the School of Arts, Design and Architecture of Aalto University. You are welcome to join us and learn how to make your research and artistic outputs more visible and boost your academic career!

When: October 30-31 at 12pm-4pm
Where: Aalto, Väre building

Find solutions to open science, research data management and copyright issues:

  • How to comply with your funders’ and university’s requirements about open access publishing and data management.
  • How to find open media on the web and how to define Creative Commons -licences you need.
  • How to share code, publish data in the Research Catalogue, get more citations.
  • How to apply funding from Aalto Open Access Fund and other funders.
  • How to write the Data Management Plan (DMP).
  • How to get an ORCID iD and distinguish yourself from other researchers.
  • Get to know open access in practice, e.g. the local tools and services we provide you.

We hope to see you there! 

Free access to my new article “Data, Collaboration, Laboratory”

My new article Data, Collaboration, Laboratory: Bringing Concepts from Science into Humanities Practice has just been published in “English Studies” (2017, Doi: 10.1080/0013838X.2017.1332022).

You can receive one of 50 free eprints! Everyone who clicks on the link below will be taken to the full article. Feel free to share it with colleagues and friends, giving them free access to the article.

http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/zCideK2GiU94xHqfG5Pp/full

Abstract:
Humanities researchers have been looking for new tools and strategies to overcome what has been called, in recent years, a “crisis” in the humanities. These efforts maintain that it is possible to change the widespread view that humanities fields are arcane or irrelevant by changing conceptual frames in ways that show the humanities to be useful, accessible and actionable. Specifically, researchers have been claiming for the humanities frames and concepts from the sciences, such as the humanities “labs” that signal (in both name and design) quantifiability, verifiability and functionality. This tactic of borrowing categories from the sciences is part of a larger tactical turn that we may call “the scientification of the humanities”. The new field of the digital humanities, in particular, is a central site for this turn. With a focus on digital humanities practices, this article aims to describe the tactical meanings, in the humanities, of the borrowed concepts data, collaboration and laboratory, all of which strategically frame the humanities as a practical, innovative and profitable field. Ultimately, I show that the trajectory of scientification in the humanities follows a path from concepts to transformation.