Spring courses

This semester I co-teach two courses (together with Prof. Lily Diaz-Kommonen) directed at MA and PhD students of the School of Arts, Design and Architecture: “Topics in Information Visualization and Cultural Analytics” and “Systems of Representation – A Culture Laboratory”. The first course combines humanistic knowledge with new media and visualization theories, practices and strategies with the objective of developing sensitive, critical understanding towards contemporary art and design, science, and technology discourses and developments. Students will learn a software tool, AtlasTi for qualitative and quantitative data analysis, creating a story using different textual sources, combining data in geographical locations, and representing networks. Through hands-on learning, we will aim to explore the topic of “The Hybrid Self” from art, design, and new media perspective. The second course, “Systems of Representation”, in turn, offers insights into a systems-oriented design approach that focuses on representation as a process related to the embodied grounding of human experience in time and space. Students will use a diversity of materials and create exhibition prototypes, including design narratives, collections of interactions, and interfaces. This year, we will have the opportunity to work with our colleagues at the ZKM museum and access digital materials from the ZKM archives that contain works and documents from the 20th and 21st century. This is gonna be a great semester and I cannot wait to see and share the outcomes!

Materials: Presentation and Mapping

In the “Materials” section, I have uploaded my presentation “Mapping a History of the Humanities and Media Labs” which I am showing today, on March 21, at the Global Digital Humanities Symposium at Michigan State University. You can also find a link to an interactive map of “(Digital) Humanities and Media Labs around the world” created in StoryMapJS tool. The map will be available for a week so please feel free to explore it! If you have any comments or suggestions, please email me: urszula.pawlicka@aalto.fi

Global Digital Humanities Symposium

I am presenting my research at the Global Digital Humanities Symposium held at Michigan State University (March 21-22, 2019). The Symposium will be livestreamed at go.cal.msu.edu/globaldh. So if you are interested in the phenomenon of humanities labs, please join my session today, on March 21, at 2.40pm (EDT time zone)!

Below, the abstract of my presentation, titled Mapping a History of the Humanities and Media Labs:
The last years can be called as a boom of laboratories in the humanities created as a physical space and as a ‘placeless’ project (virtual labs, lab podcasts) for a specific purpose and for a fixed period. The multiplication of labs has led to a state of emergency when it becomes significant to investigate their objectives and operation. Hence, I pose the following questions: What does a laboratory mean in the humanities? How did a laboratory grow from a physical workspace into an action taken around people and challenges? How did the transition occurred from the first experimental generation to the second wave of the humanities labs?

My goal is to present a lab history in the humanities, digital humanities, and media studies within a global context from the 1980s to 2018. The main part of my presentation is a map of laboratories established in the humanities and media studies around the world. Based on a survey and laboratories’ statements, I created an interactive map with labs’ descriptions and timeline to analyze the concept of the humanities lab from geographical and historical perspective.

It is vital to understand the phenomenon of laboratory in the humanities that entails significant changes in the research practices and scholarly communication. The humanities labs do not represent a unified structure but they are a cluster of various models which have their own architectures and practices. Hence, the humanities labs do not purely imitate the science lab but adapt this new structure for its own purposes and needs.

My Presentation in Helsinki Digital Humanities Research Seminar

I am pleased to say that this Friday I am going to give a speech, entitled “Visualizing Electronic Literature Collections” in Digital Humanities Research Seminar at the University of Helsinki (Metsätalo, Unioninkatu 40B, 3rd floor, lecture room 13).

More about event: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/researchgroups/digital-humanities-helsinki/digital-humanities-research-seminar

More about my presentation: http://urszulapawlicka.com/visualizingELC/

All welcome!