RDA Plenary Meeting

Together with my team of Data Agents working in the Research Data Management Support Initiative at Aalto University, we presented our work and activities at the Research Data Alliance’s 14th Plenary Meeting taking place from 23-25 October 2019 in Helsinki. It is great to share our efforts and achievements in managing research data better and making data open for everyone!

The poster is available in the Zenodo repository. Please take a look at our presentation, titled “Illustration of Data Agents network of Aalto University: Data Agents: How to put research data management into practice?”.

Ellipsis exhibition

Students of the Systems of Representation: Culture Laboratory course at the Department of Media, Media Lab of Aalto University have created an exhibition named Ellipsis that is on display at the Harald Herlin Learning Centre from 15 May – 6 June 2019. The exhibition is a collaboration with the Aalto University Archives. It was a great pleasure to work with students who rediscovered archived cultural materials in a new, creative way and raised interesting questions about time, space, and materiality.

The exhibition depicts speculative design interventions related to three case studies presented in the course: Time and its Representation in Narrative, Exhibiting the Body, and Space in Digital Media. Students reused cultural materials from the Aalto University Archives in a creative way to address the following questions: How is the representation of time constructed differently in genres and narratives across different cultures and epochs? What are some of the parameters involved when exhibiting the body? How can we use media to augment our notion of space in an exhibition? Aside from historical documentation what other roles do archives fulfill in art and design productions?

One beautiful work has been made by Jennifer Greb who reused “Dekorative Vorbilder” book from 1984. It is the ornamental design book that includes dozens of pages of hand-drawn illustrations. The book is stored in the Aalto Archives. To rediscover this beautiful book, Greb has created an Augmented Reality animation to present the illustrations in a new, dynamic way. Please come and see the exhibition! More information can be found here.

Imaginary Cities

The British Library displays a wonderful exhibition created by artist Michael Takeo Magruder. “Imaginary Cities” is the transformation of the British Library’s online collection of historic urban maps into fictional cityspaces for the Information Age.

The exhibition comprises four technology-based art installations, exclusively created using images and metadata of 19th-century city maps drawn from the Library’s “One Million Images from Scanned Books” collection on Flickr Commons. It is an impressive and beautiful artwork! It shows how digitised cultural materials can be reused in a creative way and give rise to unique born-digital artifacts. “The exhibition highlights how the Library is not simply a repository of knowledge, but a storehouse of creative potential that is constantly generating new avenues for culture”.

OpenGLAM@Aalto

Tomorrow, on 28 March, Aalto University is organizing Open GLAM meetup to connect students, professionals, and creative people with the GLAM community (Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums). The program includes fascinating topics about reusing and sharing open cultural heritage data. Join us: 28 March 2019, 3pm-5pm, Aalto University Learning Centre!

More info on the AvoinGLAM website which is a Finnish network of people and institutions interested in and working among open culture and cultural materials. It is part of an international OpenGLAM network.

ARTS Open Science drop-in sessions

I am co-organizing two-day drop-in sessions about open science and research data management at the School of Arts, Design and Architecture of Aalto University. You are welcome to join us and learn how to make your research and artistic outputs more visible and boost your academic career!

When: October 30-31 at 12pm-4pm
Where: Aalto, Väre building

Find solutions to open science, research data management and copyright issues:

  • How to comply with your funders’ and university’s requirements about open access publishing and data management.
  • How to find open media on the web and how to define Creative Commons -licences you need.
  • How to share code, publish data in the Research Catalogue, get more citations.
  • How to apply funding from Aalto Open Access Fund and other funders.
  • How to write the Data Management Plan (DMP).
  • How to get an ORCID iD and distinguish yourself from other researchers.
  • Get to know open access in practice, e.g. the local tools and services we provide you.

We hope to see you there! 

‘The Making of the Humanities VI’

Last month I had a pleasure to present my current research on laboratories in the humanities during the conference ‘The Making of the Humanities VI’ taking place at the University of Oxford, Humanities Division and Somerville College on September 28-30, 2017. The goal of my presentation, titled ‘The Emergence of Laboratories in the Humanities: Impetus, Implementation, and Impact’ was to trace a history of the humanities labs, covering the impulse and the mechanism of their creation. Below, I have attached my abstract and presentation available also in the section of ‘Projects’.

The humanities has made significant conceptual shifts that include fostering strong innovative and collaborative research, employing technologies, and building a bridge between the academy, industry, and community. Above changes mean designing and defining the humanities anew. Creating an academic discipline requires an ‘administrative imagination’; that is to say, we must build a structure aligned with development strategy. Consequently, the humanities has undergone an ‘infrastructure turn’ over the past ten years and launched a new physical place: a laboratory. The emergence of labs in the humanities has been crucial for “redefining the role of the humanities” and “re-configuration of the humanities offered by computational technologies”; however, the proliferation and the fragmentation of labs have led to a state of emergency when it becomes urgent to investigate their significance, objectives, and impact.  

The goal of the presentation is to analyze three aspects of the humanities labs: its impetus, implementation, and impact. The first part aims to trace a history of the humanities labs, covering the impulse and the mechanism of their creation. This section includes also mapping out laboratories in the humanities established all over the world. The second part presents the complex landscape of the laboratories in the humanities, launched in various ways as a physical research lab, a makerspace, a virtual network, a community project, etc. The last part examines the features of laboratories that significantly reconfigure the humanities seen as an innovative, digital technology-based field, hands-on experimental research, situated practice, engaged in community affairs, and collaborating with local companies.

Free access to my new article “Data, Collaboration, Laboratory”

My new article Data, Collaboration, Laboratory: Bringing Concepts from Science into Humanities Practice has just been published in “English Studies” (2017, Doi: 10.1080/0013838X.2017.1332022).

You can receive one of 50 free eprints! Everyone who clicks on the link below will be taken to the full article. Feel free to share it with colleagues and friends, giving them free access to the article.

http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/zCideK2GiU94xHqfG5Pp/full

Abstract:
Humanities researchers have been looking for new tools and strategies to overcome what has been called, in recent years, a “crisis” in the humanities. These efforts maintain that it is possible to change the widespread view that humanities fields are arcane or irrelevant by changing conceptual frames in ways that show the humanities to be useful, accessible and actionable. Specifically, researchers have been claiming for the humanities frames and concepts from the sciences, such as the humanities “labs” that signal (in both name and design) quantifiability, verifiability and functionality. This tactic of borrowing categories from the sciences is part of a larger tactical turn that we may call “the scientification of the humanities”. The new field of the digital humanities, in particular, is a central site for this turn. With a focus on digital humanities practices, this article aims to describe the tactical meanings, in the humanities, of the borrowed concepts data, collaboration and laboratory, all of which strategically frame the humanities as a practical, innovative and profitable field. Ultimately, I show that the trajectory of scientification in the humanities follows a path from concepts to transformation.