ARTS Open Science drop-in sessions

I am co-organizing two-day drop-in sessions about open science and research data management at the School of Arts, Design and Architecture of Aalto University. You are welcome to join us and learn how to make your research and artistic outputs more visible and boost your academic career!

When: October 30-31 at 12pm-4pm
Where: Aalto, Väre building

Find solutions to open science, research data management and copyright issues:

  • How to comply with your funders’ and university’s requirements about open access publishing and data management.
  • How to find open media on the web and how to define Creative Commons -licences you need.
  • How to share code, publish data in the Research Catalogue, get more citations.
  • How to apply funding from Aalto Open Access Fund and other funders.
  • How to write the Data Management Plan (DMP).
  • How to get an ORCID iD and distinguish yourself from other researchers.
  • Get to know open access in practice, e.g. the local tools and services we provide you.

We hope to see you there! 

Free access to my new article “Data, Collaboration, Laboratory”

My new article Data, Collaboration, Laboratory: Bringing Concepts from Science into Humanities Practice has just been published in “English Studies” (2017, Doi: 10.1080/0013838X.2017.1332022).

You can receive one of 50 free eprints! Everyone who clicks on the link below will be taken to the full article. Feel free to share it with colleagues and friends, giving them free access to the article.

http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/zCideK2GiU94xHqfG5Pp/full

Abstract:
Humanities researchers have been looking for new tools and strategies to overcome what has been called, in recent years, a “crisis” in the humanities. These efforts maintain that it is possible to change the widespread view that humanities fields are arcane or irrelevant by changing conceptual frames in ways that show the humanities to be useful, accessible and actionable. Specifically, researchers have been claiming for the humanities frames and concepts from the sciences, such as the humanities “labs” that signal (in both name and design) quantifiability, verifiability and functionality. This tactic of borrowing categories from the sciences is part of a larger tactical turn that we may call “the scientification of the humanities”. The new field of the digital humanities, in particular, is a central site for this turn. With a focus on digital humanities practices, this article aims to describe the tactical meanings, in the humanities, of the borrowed concepts data, collaboration and laboratory, all of which strategically frame the humanities as a practical, innovative and profitable field. Ultimately, I show that the trajectory of scientification in the humanities follows a path from concepts to transformation.